SQLite

SQLite is an in-process library that implements a self-contained, serverless, zero-configuration, transactional SQL database engine. The code for SQLite is in the public domain and is thus free for use for any purpose, commercial or private. SQLite is the most widely deployed database in the world with more applications than we can count, including several high-profile projects.

SQLite is an embedded SQL database engine. Unlike most other SQL databases, SQLite does not have a separate server process. SQLite reads and writes directly to ordinary disk files. A complete SQL database with multiple tables, indices, triggers, and views, is contained in a single disk file. The database file format is cross-platform – you can freely copy a database between 32-bit and 64-bit systems or between big-endian and little-endian architectures. These features make SQLite a popular choice as an Application File Format. Think of SQLite not as a replacement for Oracle but as a replacement for fopen()

SQLite is a compact library. With all features enabled, the library size can be less than 500KiB, depending on the target platform and compiler optimization settings. (64-bit code is larger. And some compiler optimizations such as aggressive function inlining and loop unrolling can cause the object code to be much larger.) If optional features are omitted, the size of the SQLite library can be reduced below 300KiB. SQLite can also be made to run in minimal stack space (4KiB) and very little heap (100KiB), making SQLite a popular database engine choice on memory constrained gadgets such as cellphones, PDAs, and MP3 players. There is a tradeoff between memory usage and speed. SQLite generally runs faster the more memory you give it. Nevertheless, performance is usually quite good even in low-memory environments.

Features Of SQLite

  • Transactions are atomic, consistent, isolated, and durable (ACID) even after system crashes and power failures.
  • Zero-configuration – no setup or administration needed.
  • Full SQL implementation with advanced features like partial indexes and common table expressions. (Omitted features)
  • A complete database is stored in a single cross-platform disk file. Great for use as an application file format.
  • Supports terabyte-sized databases and gigabyte-sized strings and blobs. (See limits.html.)
  • Small code footprint: less than 500KiB fully configured or much less with optional features omitted.
  • Simple, easy to use API.
  • Written in ANSI-C. TCL bindings included. Bindings for dozens of other languages available separately.
  • Well-commented source code with 100% branch test coverage.
  • Available as a single ANSI-C source-code file that is easy to compile and hence is easy to add into a larger project.
  • Self-contained: no external dependencies.
  • Cross-platform: Android, *BSD, iOS, Linux, Mac, Solaris, VxWorks, and Windows (Win32, WinCE, WinRT) are supported out of the box. Easy to port to other systems.
  • Sources are in the public domain. Use for any purpose.
  • Comes with a standalone command-line interface (CLI) client that can be used to administer SQLite databases.